New prisons for old ... as prime sites redeveloped for luxury flats

Birmingham prison 012 700x432

On 22 March the Justice Secretary Liz Truss announced plans to build four new prisons in England and Wales. Three of these will be on sites next to or replacing existing prisons at Full Sutton in York, Hindley in Wigan and Rochester on Kent, with the addition of a new site in Port Talbot in Wales. The four prisons will together provide 5,000 new prison places – half of the 10,000 promised by the government in its White Paper last year.

Another 2,000 places will be created at recently opened HMP Berwyn in Wrexham, north Wales, with further expansion due at two sites which were named in an earlier announcement in 2016. Glen Parva young offenders institute in Leicestershire is to close and be redeveloped as a Category C men’s prison, while Wellingborough prison, which has been empty since 2012, will also be rebuilt. The Wellingborough development has already been granted planning permission by the local council, while the Glen Parva one is due to be considered after the current prison closes in June.

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New control units to open for ‘extremist’ prisoners

KT protest

On 19 April the Prison Rules were amended to include a new Rule 46A, which allows for prisoners to be sent to a so-called Separation Centre (SC). These new units are the latest in a long line of small units which the British state has used to control and manipulate prisoners. Kevan Thakrar, who has been held in the Close Supervision Centre (CSC) system since 2010, writes:

The CSC system was initiated in 1998; its purpose was to break those the Prison Service took a dislike to, whether for being physically intimidatory, a constant protester or simply high profile. Over the years this has been very successful with the torturous conditions and regime leading to many CSC prisoners ending up being sectioned under the Mental Health Act, but due to almost constant legal challenges the structure and advertised objectives of the CSC have been forced to change along the way.

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Court victory for the Anatolian People’s Cultural Centre

Hands off the Anatolian

On 19 May comrades from the north London Anatolian People’s Cultural Centre (APCC) and their magazine Yuruyus (‘March’) won another victory for the freedom to express political views and organise around them, when Ayfer Yildiz was acquitted in the second of two trials to arise from a raid on the Centre on 6 April 2016.

The raid was clearly politically motivated and took place just weeks after Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davatoglu had met then British PM David Cameron in the course of talks around Turkey-EU refugees and trade agreements. It was justified on the basis of allegations that the APCC was fundraising for the Revolutionary People’s Liberation Party/Front (Devrimci Halk Kurtuluş Partisi-Cephesi – DHKP-C), an illegal organisation in Turkey, which is also banned in Britain under the Terrorism Act 2000. The order to close the APCC was issued under the Antisocial Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 – the first time such an order has been used in this way to close premises which are alleged to have links to a banned organisation.

The APCC was not intimidated and set up a temporary centre in a tent opposite the locked building, which remained there for 105 days, continuing the centre’s work and demanding the return of all the property confiscated in the raid.

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Detainees victimised for speaking out

On 11 March Nottingham RCG attended a demonstration outside Morton Hall immigration detention centre in Lincolnshire. After the demo, two detainees Nariman Jalal Karim and Raffael Ebison, who spoke out on the day against their treatment, were seized by the guards and moved nearly 200 miles away.

When we arrived, the prison authorities put on loud music and gave the men cola and ice cream and told them that any noise they might hear outside was because of a football team. The men were not fooled. Raffael turned off the music and Nariman, who is from Iranian Kurdistan and is being threatened with deportation to Iraq, climbed the interior fence to speak to us. He shouted to us about how he would continue to fight for freedom and thanked us for not forgetting about the people in Morton Hall.

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One of a long line of barbarians

Sir Kenneth Newman
15 August 1926–4 February 2017

A few national newspapers carried bland, uncritical obituaries for Kenneth Newman, former Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and former Commissioner of Metropolitan Police, making out that, despite a few ‘issues’, on the whole, here was an honest cop interested in management and reform of Britain’s police ‘service’ and opposed to freemasonry. Nothing could have been further from the truth. Newman was instrumental in the transformation of British policing – from ‘policing by consent’ to paramilitary policing. He was one of a cohort of leading figures in the British state – in political circles, the Army and the police – who form an unbroken line of experts and promoters of brutality, torture and coercion in the interests of British imperialism.

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